Having a dog in Korea

IMG_20171130_115206_630In 2017 we got a dog.  At the time, we have been living in Korea for almost 4 years and since we had just signed a contract to stay at our then current work place we decided it was time to get a dog. Generally dogs provide a lot of joy and is also a good stress reliever. Research even suggest that people who own pets, are happier than those who don’t. Therefore…. since there’s research involved… we got a dog

Getting the perfect puppy

If you do research about where to get a puppy you’ll come up with a lot of bad reviews about dogs from pet shops. Furthermore, if you walk into some pet shops you can immediately see that some of those dogs are either under fed or already looking sick.

Therefore we decided to get a puppy from an owner who already has his own dogs and is not a dog breeder. We were in luck as my friend heard that we were looking for a dachshund and she saw an advertisement in the local ‘cafe’ about dachshund puppies for sale. Luckily the owner was really particular about giving his puppies to a good home and to us, it meant that he really cares for them.

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Because we lived in an apartment we had to crate train her, which really helped her. Even today she still finds her comfort in her little crate although we changed her crate from a plastic one to a cute fluffy little house. She knows that she’s safe there and even though she eats my shoes, I won’t touch  her in there. The crate training also helped her a lot when we traveled across Korea and overseas.

 

 

Korean Souvenirs

We have officially started our holiday countdown. For those of you who don’t know this yet, we’re going back home to South Africa for a month to take a little break. We’re leaving on Thursday and we’re just about ready to go. We haven’t packed yet but we have already bought some souvenirs to take back home.

Its not very easy to choose what to take, because you want to take something that’s Korean but also not so much Korean that you’re family can’t use it, for example chopsticks aren’t very useful in western countries unless you like a lot of Chinese, Japanese and Korean dishes. You also want to take something home that’s special.

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This is what we’ve decided to take. Honey flower cakes and Honey Butter Walnuts. Honey and Butter is something that is truly very Korean. We get all kinds of Honey infused foods here, from bread and pizza to potato chips and even nuts so I thought that would be a nice treat for our parents. I’ve also gotten some Green Tea Kit Kats.( I see they’re actually from Japan…. but I’m taking them home in anyway 🙂 ) In addition to honey butter, Koreans love Green Tea in their cakes and sweets and I thought that would be really nice for the people back home to try.

As mentioned previously chopsticks might not be the best gift but I got some in anyway.

img_6918 I also bought a french brandyimg_6920

and some cute traditional Korean key-chains.img_6924

Korea is also known for it’s amazing beauty products so I’m also taking some of the Tony Moly Pokemon cosmetics home.

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Now all that’s left is packing 🙂

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The lonely Expat Christmas

When choosing to leave your home country to live in another country, it all sounds really exiting and cool. Truth be told, it is mostly cool and exiting. But then sometimes, its not…

When you leave your home for whatever reason, there will be some unforeseen troubles along the way. Things that will make you miss home. Or sometimes you’ll just need a hug, but there will be no-one to hug you.

One of the things that you need to consider is whether or not you’re willing to give up the precious time that you have with loved ones. One of life’s infinite truths are that we will all die. Its inevitable that someone you know will leave this world, and depending on how long you’re away from home, you might not be there in their final hours of need.

It is a choice that you will have to make before you leave home. You could have spend a few precious moments with that person and you didn’t. But just because you can’t be there in person, make sure that you are there for them in different ways. Remember to call home ever so often. Send Christmas and Birthday gifts. Show them that you care for them even though you’re not there.

One of the things that we have to live with is having no one for Christmas. This year Christmas falls on a Sunday meaning that our Christmas holiday isn’t long enough for us to visit our families. They might put a few minutes aside for us during a Skype call but after that, we’re all alone again, and if they forget to call then you’re whole Christmas is ruined.

This Christmas, remember your loved one in far off distant lands, whether you’re the one away from home, or them. Give them  a call or send them a little card just to say I LOVE & MISS YOU!!!!

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Workwear (Korea)

Korea is different from the western world, they have a different culture and ways of doing things. Although they also wear clothes that come from american and European companies there are still some taboos. For instance girls can wear extremely short miniskirts but it is totally inappropriate to show shoulders, collarbones or cleavage. The social laws seem to be relaxing nowadays but in some areas of the country it is still considered highly inappropriate. Therefore when coming to Korea try and keep it conservative as you will be working with these people’s children.

Summer Outfits

You should be able to get away with showing you shoulders as long as it’s not in a strappy top. In summer you can wear lovely floral dresses or skirts. Your shoes should be chosen according to your school. If you’re working at a private academy (hagwon) then go with flat shoes because you’ll be on your feet the whole day. In public schools however you’ll wear slippers inside the buildings so you could wear high heels to work if you choose.

It is always better to put your best foot forward in a new work environment. Your style can become more relaxed once you’ve settled and seen what the other people at your work wear. Generally though the Koreans are dressed to the nines. A lot of foreigners wear jeans to work here in Korea but they keep it formal rather than casual.

What not to wear to work!

Although this outfit is really cute it is not something you should wear to work. Uggs with jeans are OK in winter because it is freezing  but not with sweats and t-shirts. You are a professional, try and  act like it.

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My family

Today I would like to share my family with you. I have chosen a picture from my wedding back in 2007. It is one of the last photo’s I have of my mother still alive and well, with  the rest of our nuclear family. It is also at that time that we added more family members to our little family.

The first picture is of my parents. The second is of my husbands’ parents and the last picture is of us and our brothers.

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